Pennsylvania ranks among top states in deer-vehicle collisions, according to AAA

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Pennsylvania consistently ranks among the top states for deer-vehicle collisions, according to the AAA, and we are now entering the peak of deer mating season.

“We see an increase in the number of motorists hitting deer in October, November and December each year,” said Jana Tidwell, AAA Public Affairs. “Pennsylvania traditionally ranks in the top three states in the nation for the number of deer attacks we see here each year. Locally, in the Philadelphia Five Counties area, Bucks County, Chester County and the Montgomery County are three of the top ten counties in Pennsylvania where we see the most deer attacks.”

Dave’s Automotive Repair in West Chester sees between two and three vehicles damaged a month during deer mating season.

“The worst we saw here was by far a very nice lady who brought her car. She ran through her windshield and she got kicked in the face by the deer,” said JT Aloisio, head of automotive repairs. “She was in a good mood though. She was joking about it saying all that. It was just Christmas time so she said the reindeer were coming to get her.”

Dave’s Automotive Repair in West Chester sees between two and three vehicles damaged a month during deer mating season.

Aloisio said he hit a deer in his grandfather’s truck last fall and the damage quickly accumulated and would have cost around $4,500.

In Pennsylvania, the average insurance claim was about $4,300, according to AAA.

“Early in the morning people come to work, that’s when I hit a deer on my way to work,” Aloisio said. hit a deer while fetching dinner for the family.”

Aloisio said his wife, brother and aunt have also had deer collisions in recent years.

Pennsylvania consistently ranks among the top states for deer-vehicle collisions, according to the AAA, and we are now entering the peak of deer mating season.

“It was unfortunate, it definitely ruined my morning,” Aloisio said.

Deer are most active and come out at dawn and dusk.

“Eliminate driving distractions. The phone, the radio, eating, drinking that stuff. Focus on the roads,” Tidwell said. “If you have the unfortunate experience of hitting a deer, first and foremost, never approach the deer, move your vehicle to the side of the road to a safe location and call the police immediately.”

Here is additional safety information from AAA:

  • Pay attention to traffic signs. Yellow diamond-shaped signs with the image of a deer indicate areas with high deer activity.
  • Don’t drive distracted. Continuously scan the roads. Drivers should continually scan the road ahead of the vehicle for signs of animals and movement. Animals can also travel along the road, so be sure to look on both sides of the road as well. Although the most likely accident occurs when drivers hit an animal, there may be times when the animal hits the vehicle.
  • Pay particular attention early in the morning and in the evening. Many animals, especially deer, are most active from 5am to 8am and 5pm to 8pm, peak times for many.
  • Use high beam when there is no oncoming traffic. You can spot the animals earlier. Sometimes the light reflected from their eyes will reveal their location.
  • Slow down and watch for other deer to appear. Deer rarely travel alone, so if you see one, there are probably others nearby.
  • Slow down on turns. It is more difficult to spot animals on bends.
  • A long shot. A long blast on the horn can scare animals away from your vehicle.
  • Resist the urge to swerve: instead stay in your lane with both hands firmly on the wheel. Getting away from the animals can confuse them and they don’t know where to go. It can also put you in the path of oncoming traffic or crash into something like a lamp post or tree.
  • If the accident is imminent, take your foot off the brake: when braking hard, the front of your vehicle is pulled down, which can cause the animal to climb over the hood toward your windshield. Releasing the brake can protect drivers from windshield collisions, as the animal is more likely to be pushed to the side of the vehicle or onto the roof of the vehicle.
  • Always wear a seat belt. The chances of being injured by hitting an animal are much higher if you don’t have your seat belt on.
  • Drivers should consider getting comprehensive insurance, if they don’t already have it. All risk insurance is the type of insurance that covers animal strikes.

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